How to Filet Crochet #filetcrochet
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How to Filet Crochet #filetcrochet





They all say filet crochet is so easy, and it is, but learning it can be quite hard. Check out pretty much EVERYTHING you could ever ask to learn filet crochet, including worksheets to help you figure those confusing graphs out!

They all say filet crochet is so easy, and it is, but learning it can be quite hard. Check out pretty much EVERYTHING you could ever ask to learn filet crochet, including worksheets to help you figure those confusing graphs out! Many, many years ago I found a filet stitch pattern that I really dug and I wanted to make it. But the thing is, I totally didn't understand it. What is this crazy checkerboard-esque set of blocks and how in the world is that supposed to translate to stitches? Through lots of reading I was able to figure out the basics but, alas, I could never figure the darn business out. I'd sit there and create my foundation chain and then work my first row to find that I had too many or too few chain stitches in that foundation for business to work out. I'd count and count and try to work it out but would come up short and toss my yarn and hook down. It turns out that a lot of my problem with filet crochet is that I didn't understand the count. I was finally able to teach myself filet crochet and, I'm not going to lie, it was a beast and a half for me to figure out. Maybe there's just some block in my brain that made things not happen for me and every other hooker out there has no problem with it, but maybe all of the directions are really difficult? I think that a big part of the issue with me trying to learn is that it seemed everything I read assumed that I already understood certain things. But the fact is, I was coming into this bright, shiny and new with no knowledge to pull from to understand that somethings with filet crochet just are because, well, they just are. I think another one of the issues is that for filet crochet one size doesn't necessarily fit all. There are lots of factors that determine how your pieces will turn out. Do you hook tightly or loosely? How tall are your double crochet stitches? Do you want to work in the chains or the gaps from the previous row? So yesterday I totally got a wild hair to make filet stitch more accessible to people who learn like me. Sometimes I do better with lots of pictures. Sometimes I do better with a little video instruction. And always I do better when somebody explains to me what might go wrong and how to fix it if it does. Now I don't know all things filet crochet, to be quite honest, but I know enough now to work my way around. Today our goal is learning how to read and use filet graphs to hook up filet crochet pieces. Tuck in, guys, 'cause this is a loooooong ride :) What is filet crochet? The end goal with filet crochet is to create a whole bunch of little squares (not rectangles), some filled in, some not, to make a pattern visible in your crochet fabric. Filet crochet is typically worked in a single color. Lighter weight (thinner) yarns seem to work best for filet crochet, but you can use any weight you'd like. Fuzzy yarns don't work as well as smoother yarn to make a striking image pop out because all that fuzz does affect the sharpness of the design. Cotton yarns are most often referenced to be used for filet crochet and, in my experience, cotton is always easier to work with than anything acrylic and it blocks up well so that we can work out any imperfections in our shape once the design has been hooked up. The basis for all filet crochet pieces is the design, recorded in a graph. How do you read a filet crochet graph? Above is a simple heart filet crochet graph. It has 9 columns (horizontally) and 8 rows (vertically). The black squares are filled in sections of the grid, accomplished with double crochet stitches and the white blocks are skipped areas, accomplished with chain stitches. If the design is symmetrical, like the graph above, you can work left to right or right to left because no matter which way you go, the design is the same. But if the pattern is asymmetrical, you typically work from right to left and then left to right for the next row, changing directions as you move up the graph. Be sure to read the directions by a pattern creator, if available, to make sure this is the direction they want you to work in. That's right, you work a filet graph up from the bottom up to the top. You know how you read a book left to right and top to bottom? You're supposed to read these graphs in the complete opposite. But if I'm being honest, I often can't remember that and I still work left to right top to bottom most of the time and I haven't had any problems. What can I say, I'm a crochet rogue. Let's first learn the foundation of the filet crochet stitch, the grid. I seriously had the hardest time figuring out how those black and white boxes translated to crochet stitches. And here's how I finally did it... think of all of your filet crochet pieces as a basic grid. See those stitches up there? Those are the stitches you're going to make in those exact places every single row. These stitches make up the grid and within each square of that grid you will either fill it with a pair of double crochet stitches or skip it with a pair of chain stitches. But no matter what, those stitches above you're going to hit just like you see every. single. time. How do I count stitches when working from a filet crochet graph? Though everybody will tell you how easy filet crochet is (and it is once you learn it!) I had such difficulty with counting

Ken